General Sociology

The documentaries below have links to general sociological themes.


Former president of Uruguay José Alberto Mujica guides us through the documentary with his thoughts on a more just world. Through the eyes of African migrants and Spanish and Japanese workers, we experience how globalization is affecting the lives of ordinary people. The documentary interweaves stories of people on three continents: African migrants who want to flee to Europe; Spanish workers who can no longer make ends meet; and Japanese employees facing loneliness in the modern world.


Women’s rights attorney Gloria Allred takes on the biggest names in American culture as coverage of sexual assault allegations in the media become more prevalent.


Documentary following the police department in Flint, Michigan as they struggle with dwindling resources and crumbling infrastructure in a community crippled by violence and a contaminated water crisis.


The Mask You Live In is a movie starring Joe Herman, Michael Kimmel, and Caroline Heldman. Explores how our culture’s narrow definition of masculinity is harming our boys, men and society at large and unveils what we can do about it.


The Red Pill chronicles filmmaker Cassie Jaye’s journey following the mysterious and polarizing Men’s Rights Movement. The Red Pill explores today’s gender war and asks the question “what is the future of gender equality?”


Are we controlled? To what extent and by whom? What does it mean for humanity’s future? The enormous implications of these questions deter most of us who must deal with the daily consequences of the answers. STATE OF MIND digs deeply into the sources to reveal that much of that which we believe to be true has been deception, deliberately implanted in our consciousness to erect a “tyranny over the minds of men”. From cradle to grave our parents, peers, institutions and society inform our values and behaviours.


Saving Capitalism is a documentary film that follows former Secretary of Labour and Professor, Robert Reich, as he takes his book and his views to the heart of conservative America to speak about our economic system and present big ideas for how to fix it.


The modern day Four Horsemen continue to ride roughshod over the people who can least afford it. Crises are converging when governments, religion and mainstream economists have stalled. 23 international thinkers come together and break their silence about how the world really works and why there is still hope in re-establishing a moral and just society. Four Horsemen ignites the debate about how we usher a new economic paradigm into the world which, globally, would dramatically improve the quality of life for billions.


Explores the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America, and challenges the media’s limited portrayal of what it means to be a powerful woman.


Capitalism: A Love Story is a movie starring Michael Moore, William Black, and Jimmy Carter. An examination of the social costs of corporate interests pursuing profits at the expense of the public good.


This documentary provides a look at the social product that Disney produces through the messages it sends through its movies and its impact upon ethnicity and gender. Additionally, it propagates the purchase of swag associated with entertainment produced.


In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, “Remember This House.” The book was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and assassinations of three of his close friends: Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the time of Baldwin’s death in 1987, he left behind only 30 completed pages of this manuscript. Filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished.


Off-grid is not a state of mind. Off-grid simply means living without a connection to the electric and natural gas infrastructure. From 2011 to 2013 Jonathan Taggart and Phillip Vannini spent two years travelling across Canada to find 200 off-gridders and visit them in their homes. They chronicled in depth the experiences, challenges, inventions, aspirations, and ways of life of people who have chosen to radically re-invent daily life in a dramatically innovative but also quite traditional way.


The Bowery: for centuries it has been one of New York City’s major arteries, in every sense of the word: a gritty and vital counterpoint to the theaters of Broadway and the mansions of Fifth Avenue. Traditionally a rowdy avenue of nickel museums and burlesque shows, by the beginning of the 20th century it had become America’s most famous ‘skid row’, lined with flop houses, missions, and bars. Only a few decades ago, these flophouses served as a nightly refuge for 25, 000 men on the fringes of society: the poor, the wretched, the overwhelmed; some scoundrels, but more of them decent men whose luck had simply failed them.


Hosted by twice Oscar nominated actor Woody Harrelson, Ethos explores the mechanisms in our systems that work against democracy, the environment and our own personal liberty.


This documentary, as led by Russell Brand and directed by Michael Winterbottom, essentially shows where unbridled capitalism takes us. We live in a time where a cleaner earns 300 times less than his/her boss, and if all bankers in the UK would give up their salary for one day, they would double what said cleaners would make for a YEAR.


This film gathers information from many sources and puts it together in a way that shows it is possible for people to be manipulated by large institutions, governments and economic powers. It is divided into 3 parts. 1. Religion: Pagan astrological beliefs compared to modern and ancient religions.  2. 9/11: An overview of the numerous questionable aspects of this immensely important event.  3. The Federal Reserve Bank: A history of its formation and ability to control the economy.  With many news clips from tragic events in history, audio excerpts from those who believe people are being misled about the level of freedom they have.


Daryl Davis is an accomplished musician who was played all over the world. He also has an unusual hobby, particularly for a middle aged black man. When not displaying his musical chops, Daryl likes to meet and befriend members of the Ku Klux Klan. When many of these people eventually leave the Klan with Daryl’s support, Daryl keeps their robes and hoods; building his collection piece by piece, story by story, person by person, in hopes of one day opening a museum of the Klan.

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